Saturday, February 18, 2012

Saturday, February 18, 2012

From ANDREW DRUMMOND, BANGKOK, February 18 2012


British police investigating the rape and murder of Welsh backpacker Kirsty Jones, who was just 23 when she was brutally murdered and raped in a Chiang Mai guest house, are back in Thailand trying once again to catch her killer.


Detective Chief Superintendent Steve Wilkins, of Dyfed Powys Police has returned 12 years after the event. He has issued a statement (below).  It looks like this is the DCS's last effort to try and catch Kirsty's killer before he retires in two months time. But Kirsty's mum Sue Jones says she will never give up.


Det.Chief Superintendent Steve Wilkins


'We are attending a meeting next week with the Thai authorities to discuss the current position of the investigation as well as their main lines of enquiry, in particular the forensic evidence.


'I believe the DNA profile that they have should be the focus of the investigation and we are willing to assist them in interpreting its value.


'We think that the answers to this case rest in Thailand, in particular in Chiang Mai.


"Back in October 2010 we responded to a Letter of Request from Thai Attorney General.


"We are still waiting for responses to some issues that we raised relating to the work that we carried out.


"This work included the re-interviewing of a number of witnesses who are now residents in the UK as well as cross boarder collaboration with the Scottish Crown Office and other Police forces and agencies. We also traced a number of witnesses living in Thailand and one living in India.'


Voice file: http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2012/02/16/welsh-detectives-to-meet-thai-authorities-to-discuss-dna-findings-of-murdered-welsh-student-kirsty-jones-91466-30345754/#ixzz1mhXJna9f



It is no secret that the lack of progress on the case - Thai police have a complete DNA profile of the killer - has frustrated the British detectives.  Last year an Australian retiree in Chiang Mai posted on the net that he was convinced the culprit was a Chiang Mai academic and friend of a local tourist policeman.




Detective Chief Superintendent Steve Wilkins (left) and Det.Superintendent Steve Hughson on an earlier visit to Chiang Mai


He gave a long story as to why he had come to this conclusion. We passed on the information to Dyfed-Powys police through the Serious Organised Crime Agency. The DSI were also informed.


Subsquently DNA tests taken last year. Initially the University lecturer refused. But he later agreed. But the first set appears to have been botched.  The results of the second set have not been revealed publicly. Perhaps they too were inconclusive.  This may be an issue.


Among the matters to be discussed according to Dyfed-Powys Police is the clarification' of a DNA test.


The Serious Organised Crime Agency representative at the British Embassy, has specifically requested Dyfed-Powys attend this latest meeting, passing on the request from Thailand's Department of Special Investigations.


Dyfed-Powys Police have interviewed a number of people in the UK, including Andy Gill, the owner of the Aree Guest House at the time who now lives in Scotland.




Andy Gill was arrested and detained on suspicion of the murder but was released after DNA was found to be of Asian origin

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