Sunday, December 1, 2013

Sunday, December 01, 2013
10

Over 100,000 red shirt supporters of the beleaguered Thai government were told by their leaders to go home today after a 21-year-old student was shot dead last night at Ramkhamhaeng University in Bangkok.

Fearing their protest could end in bloodshed in clashes with anti-government demonstrators, leaders advised the red-shirts that they could come back another day – but now was not the time to take to the streets.

Last night a 21-year-old student named as  Taweesak Phokaew was shot in the abdomen at Ramkhamhaeng University and died on the way hospital. At least five others were reported injured.

Apiwat Nakpao, deputy president of Ramkhamheang University Students Organisation told ‘The Nation’ newspaper that seven or eight men in in the university compound and shot students.

Meanwhile red short leader Jatuporn Promphan today claimed four red supporters were also killed last night. Not details have been given of these ‘deaths’ but he said it while encouraging everyone to go home.

“We need to avoid confrontation and further loss of life”.

The decision to abandon their protest gives the Red Shirts a significant political victory. If they do as promised they will have shown their support of the government in a peaceful manner,  while there have been ugly scenes of anti-government supporters attacking cars, taxis and buses containing red shirts.

Nevertheless there has been widespread anger at the redshirts’ presence in Ramkhamhaeng.


Meanwhile anti-government protesters said today they planned to march on Government House, Bangkok's Dusit Zoo, the Thai Government Public Relations Department, national and Bangkok police headquarters, and the ministries of Commerce, Agriculture, Foreign Affairs, Labour, Education and Interior.


10 comments:

  1. "RED SHIRTS SCORE POLITICAL VICTORY" I beg to differ. Calling this violent mob (historically proven) to come to BKK in the first pace is asking for trouble. So far, however inconvenient, the protest was non violent, roses and whistles. When Thida asked all Reds to come to BKK we all could figure what would happen. No, not a political victory, anything but.

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    1. I beg to differ as well.

      I'm guessing that the reason they left is that the reds were up against students and didn't want the same stigma that was attached to the pro government forces in 1973. After all, the score is only 4 dead students to zero pro government protesters.

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  2. "RED SHIRTS SCORE POLITICAL VICTORY" I beg to differ. Calling this violent mob (historically proven) to come to BKK in the first pace is asking for trouble. So far, however inconvenient, the protest was non violent, roses and whistles. When Thida asked all Reds to come to BKK we all could figure what would happen. No, not a political victory, anything but.

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  3. It is a dangerous move for the military to try to mediate. That is not their role in a proper democracy. Failed mediation then leads to coups. The proper place for mediation and debate is parliament but some sides won't accept that. Most Thais seem to want a fairer democracy with their elected representatives making the decisions on governing the country. Others need to re-think what democracy really means. It is not rule by an elite of "good men" selected without using the ballot box.

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  4. Andre, are you saying that the red shirts are a violent mob (historically proven) but that the present anti-government protesters are not. I dislike Taksin but I dislike even more the idea that a country should be run by :good men" not elected through democratic procedures. Which is this and previous clashes between the parties has been about. Yingluck has played it as cool as she can. The arrest warrant for incitement was not applied, though there is a legal case for arrest when murder is proposed. She has done what all pms do and continued censorship of the press when violence is threatened. But could she really have done otherwise given the way the comments for more incitement relayed on last nights airwaves were going? Did you hear what was said prior to the cut in transmission? No country in the world would have allowed it.

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  5. Welcome to the Land of Smiles. Solutions !!!! Dream on. A Coupe is the only outcome. This will happen on Wednesday when the army turn against the Government. My prediction. Get Tony Blair back for his free thoughts on how he would do it the same way he brought peace and stability to The Middle East. There is only one way Thailand will/can move on/forward and until that happens there will be tit for tat and idiotic behavior from all sides. Therefore the blame must lie with the countries who shelter fugitives from justice. EXTRADITION NOW.

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    1. I'm quite sure most Thais prefer sedans over coupes.
      Why, oh why are the UDD Idiots or are they the PADophiles? (Red -yellow- red yellow- daughter-sister- daughter -sister..) going to attack the zoo? Leave the animals out of it, oh- what noooooo ....for dinner?
      We need a virus, and he got to be fast and he's got to be strong, Oh we need a virus ...[sing along]

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  6. But then again democracy is presumably not about huge vote buying at election time, feudal authority in many constituencies based on cash or favours, so-called independent organizations blatantly partisan about who to arrest or prosecute, nor about incumbent governments defying their own courts. What democracy amounts to is driven by context not by universal absolutes.

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  7. Feudal morons, the lot of them. First selling their votes, now backing out of the deal - as an out of place with democratic principles as a three year old would be in a brothel.
    Quit bickering, you fools-this is our chance to save this beautiful country from its horrid, undeserved populace!

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  8. In the same way that Thailand and the Thais can only be understood if the non-western concepts of face, grengjai, mai bhen rai etc are appreciated; Thai politics can only be interpreted by realising the country is governed by networks (mainly the military) and not only through the ballot box. Both Western and Thai academics (McCargo particularly) have made that point. Never picked up by the media of course though the average Thai is fully aware. www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jzhhf94TZOE

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