Monday, October 20, 2014

Monday, October 20, 2014
6
HIGH NOON IN THE SAMUI ARCHIPELAGO?



Head of Koh Phangan Police - He could join the 'Outlaws'

British police might be well advised to send two teams to investigate the murders of Hannah Witheridge and David Miller when they take up the offer by Prime Minister General Prauth Chan-ocha.

The first time should be the official one – the second team should come as tourists and operate without a minder but they should not go biking with Police Colonel Prachum, head of Koh Phangan Police and an integral part of the investigation who may have heard that the Thai Presidency for the 'Outlaws' motorcycle club has been up for grabs.

There are contradictory statements about what they will or not be able to do from the Prime Minister himself. Those contradictions echo throughout the system.

Prachum likes the Merc. He could be a lot richer than the arriving British detectives - which is what counts.


Yet there are organisations and perhaps even witnesses here who would wish to talk directly to British detectives, something the current authorities it appears might not wish to happen. The Thai Police view and the government view is that the murder is solved. The case is closed.

Village head with Prachum


Take this from today’s Bangkok Post:

“Police are ready to cooperate with British observers in the case of two British tourists murdered on Koh Tao, according to Pol Col Prachum Ruangthong, superintendent of Phangan police station”.


Prachum with Sean McAnna


But today at the National Human Rights Commission, a source told me,  Colonel Prachum was emphatic they would not assist British police in any investigation. The matter was closed. End of story.

Members of the NHCR are concerned. They want to talk to British police.  There have been all sorts of mentions of island 'mafias', extra police income from island 'families' etc.  Police say there are no mafias on the island.

Meanwhile the NHCR has summonsed some eight different police teams to a hearing next week. The NHRC's brief at the moment is to examine allegations of torture, not the guilt or innocence of the accused.


6 comments:

  1. What matters of course is credibility.

    While Thailand is something of a 'destination' for people with good reason to hold negative feelings towards the police (Brian Goudie) being a fine example of someone who perhaps doesn't like the idea of being questioned by the British Police, most law abiding citizens of the UK hold the British Police in relatively high respect - Professional, Honest(isn) and one of the least corrupt police forces in the world.

    Any concerns raised by visiting British Police Officers over the conduct of this case will pitch one of the most respected police forces in the world against a police force which many believe to be utterly corrupt.

    The Thai police stand their claim to have captured the real killers on the basis of the DNA evidence.

    If they believe their case to be solid they could do no better than allow the British Police to take their own DNA samples.

    Endorsement of the Thai Police DNA findings by arguably the most respected police force in the world can only be good news for the boys in brown.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Any police force that was allowed to investigate the accusations against are bound to be found the least corrupt force in the world. The 70s and 80s were littered with police corruption and set ups. How many cases have had to be overturned? More so, How many innocent people are still locked up?

      Delete
    2. Ah 'leave thailand' the 70s and 80's - 'Life on Mars' when copper whacked villains and one could go on a pub crawl in a panda car. Missed those days.

      Delete
  2. Their case is not solid, there was no lawyer at the interrogations which is a violation of the law regarding capital crimes with the death penalty, hence the" conspiracy to commit" charges.
    What they are really doing is all about maneuvering a light sentence instead of just admitting they have the wrong guys.
    Visitors to Thailand should be aware reputation takes precedence over substance in all instances and there are rapists and murderers acting with impunity because of it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just another Thai policeman with assets and possessions that could never be purchased with his salary. I guess he has rich parents or private business. No reason to suspect he is corrupt or being paid by local 'influential people' for protection. I also just saw a fairy at the bottom of my garden and a pig flying overhead.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good points Christy. As you say the charge is conspiracy to rape and murder (not rape and murder). I've mentioned that before but of course it's not an attention-grabbing sound bite.

    ReplyDelete